Tuesday, 29 November 2022 00:00

Plantar fasciitis is a foot condition many people are unaware they may have until it becomes painful. The plantar fascia is defined as the band of tissue that lies on the sole of the foot and connects the heels to the toes. An injury can cause plantar fasciitis to occur, which is a result of an inflamed plantar fascia. The pain is felt in the heel and may radiate to the calf, affecting the Achilles tendon. This condition can happen from wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, or from standing on hard surfaces for most of the day. Pregnant women may temporarily experience plantar fasciitis from the extra weight the heels must endure. Some people may be prone to getting this condition if they have tight foot or calf muscles. This may be prevented when specific stretches are frequently performed, such as heel raises and calf stretches. The heel raises are done by standing on a step while lowering one heel at a time until a gentle stretch is felt. A foam roller is used to effectively stretch the calves. This is done while sitting in a chair and rolling the affected foot back and forth. Some people use a water bottle or a tennis ball, which can yield the same results. Plantar fasciitis can cause severe pain and can interfere with completing daily activities. If you are afflicted with this condition, please confer with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can offer you the correct treatment options.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact one of our podiatrists  from Foot and Ankle Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Egg Harbor Township, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 22 November 2022 00:00

An open sore on the foot is known as a foot ulcer. It can be common among diabetic patients who have cuts on their feet, which they may not be aware of. A simple cut may develop into a foot ulcer as a result of neuropathy, which causes the inability to feel existing wounds, cuts, or scrapes on the feet. There are varying degrees of foot ulcers, which can range from a shallow wound that is on the surface to a deep wound involving the tendons and bones. Any type of wound on the foot needs prompt medical attention, and this may prevent a foot ulcer from developing. A wound on the foot is treated by cleaning out debris that may be inside of it. This is followed by tightly wrapping it with a bandage that can protect the foot, and it is beneficial to elevate it as often as possible. The more shallow the wound is, the greater the chances of a complete healing is possible. If you have a foot wound, please consult with a podiatrist who can offer the correct treatment methods for wound care.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Foot and Ankle Center. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Egg Harbor Township, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Friday, 18 November 2022 00:00

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Tuesday, 15 November 2022 00:00

A variety of different foot conditions can potentially become more likely as an individual ages and advances through their later years in life. One of these conditions that every senior citizen ought to be aware of is known as fat pad atrophy. All individuals have fat padding that is located on the heel and ball of the foot. Due to repeated pressure and activity, this padding can be greatly reduced and thinned as one matures. It is estimated that about 30% of all Americans who have reached 60 years of age are experiencing fat pad atrophy. Fat pad atrophy can have noticeable and significant effects on an individual’s health. For example, as a result of the condition, a person can experience increased pain. If you are a senior citizen, it might be a good idea to reach out to a podiatrist and schedule an appointment today. This foot specialist can help you mitigate fat pad atrophy.

Proper foot care is something many older adults forget to consider. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot and Ankle Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

The Elderly and Their Feet

As we age we start to notice many changes in our body, but the elder population may not notice them right away. Medical conditions may prevent the elderly to take notice of their foot health right away. Poor vision is a lead contributor to not taking action for the elderly.

Common Conditions 

  • Neuropathy – can reduce feeling in the feet and can hide many life-threatening medical conditions.
  • Reduced flexibility – prevents the ability of proper toenail trimming, and foot cleaning. If left untreated, it may lead to further medical issues.
  • Foot sores – amongst the older population can be serious before they are discovered. Some of the problematic conditions they may face are:
  • Gouging toenails affecting nearby toe
  • Shoes that don’t fit properly
  • Pressure sores
  • Loss of circulation in legs & feet
  • Edema & swelling of feet and ankles

Susceptible Infections

Diabetes and poor circulation can cause general loss of sensitivity over the years, turning a simple cut into a serious issue.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Egg Harbor Township, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Taking Care of Elderly Feet

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