Tuesday, 16 July 2024 00:00

Ingrown toenails account for a significant portion of foot problems, accounting for approximately 20 percent of cases. This condition occurs when the edge of a toenail grows into the surrounding skin, causing pain, swelling, and sometimes infection. Common causes include improper nail trimming, wearing tight shoes, and genetic predisposition. Relief techniques focus on reducing discomfort and preventing further issues. Soaking the affected foot in warm, soapy water can soften the skin and nails, providing temporary relief. Wearing properly fitting shoes with ample toe room and trimming nails straight across, rather than in a curved shape, may help to prevent ingrown toenails. If you have developed this condition, it is strongly suggested that you visit a podiatrist who can successfully treat ingrown toenails, which may include minor surgery for removal.

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact one of our podiatrists of Foot and Ankle Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Egg Harbor Township, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Friday, 12 July 2024 00:00

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Tuesday, 09 July 2024 00:00

Osteoarthritis progresses through four stages, each affecting the feet differently. In the early stage, the cartilage in the joints begins to wear down, causing mild pain and stiffness in the feet, often after physical activity. As the condition advances to the moderate stage, the cartilage damage worsens, leading to increased discomfort, swelling, and difficulty in moving the toes and ankles. The severe stage of osteoarthritis is characterized by significant cartilage loss, resulting in constant pain, inflammation, and reduced mobility. In the final stage, the cartilage is almost completely worn away, causing intense pain, deformities, and a drastic decrease in function. This progression impacts daily activities, emphasizing the need for early intervention. If your feet are affected by this type of arthritis, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can help you to manage this condition.

Arthritis can be a difficult condition to live with. If you are seeking treatment, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot and Ankle Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Arthritic Foot Care  

Arthritis is a term that is commonly used to describe joint pain.  The condition itself can occur to anyone of any age, race, or gender, and there are over 100 types of it.  Nevertheless, arthritis is more commonly found in women compared to men, and it is also more prevalent in those who are overweight. The causes of arthritis vary depending on which type of arthritis you have. Osteoarthritis for example, is often caused by injury, while rheumatoid arthritis is caused by a misdirected immune system.

Symptoms

  • Swelling
  • Pain
  • Stiffness
  • Decreased Range of Motion

Arthritic symptoms range in severity, and they may come and go. Some symptoms stay the same for several years but could potentially get worse with time. Severe cases of arthritis can prevent its sufferers from performing daily activities and make walking difficult.

Risk Factors

  • Occupation – Occupations requiring repetitive knee movements have been linked to osteoarthritis
  • Obesity – Excess weight can contribute to osteoarthritis development
  • Infection – Microbial agents can infect the joints and trigger arthritis
  • Joint Injuries – Damage to joints may lead to osteoarthritis
  • Age – Risk increases with age
  • Gender –Most types are more common in women
  • Genetics – Arthritis can be hereditary

If you suspect your arthritis is affecting your feet, it is crucial that you see a podiatrist immediately. Your doctor will be able to address your specific case and help you decide which treatment method is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Egg Harbor Township, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 02 July 2024 00:00

Plantar digital neuroma, commonly known as Morton's neuroma, is a painful condition involving the thickening of tissue surrounding one of the nerves leading to the toes. This condition typically develops between the third and fourth toes and causes sharp, burning pain and often a feeling of having a pebble in the shoe. Wearing high-heeled or tight shoes, repetitive stress, and certain foot deformities like bunions and hammertoes can contribute to developing a neuroma. To prevent plantar digital neuroma, it helps to wear well-fitted, low-heeled shoes with adequate toe room and cushioning. It is also beneficial to avoid activities that place excessive pressure on the ball of the foot. Regularly stretching, strengthening foot muscles, and maintaining a healthy weight can reduce the risk of Morton's neuroma. If you have pain between your toes, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can accurately diagnose and treat this condition.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact one of our podiatrists of Foot and Ankle Center. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Egg Harbor Township, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma

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